Our Traditions

At Greenwood Conjure, we pride ourselves in delivering tools and services that we've cultivated over decades of intensive private study as well as with formal teachers and mentors.

We relish the beauty and power of the traditions that have welcomed us into their mysteries and believe it is our duty to both uphold their origins and uniqueness as well as make their medicines our own as have our predecessors who have gone before us.

We combine our knowledge of traditional magic and folkways with cunning, innovation, and creativity to address concerns in all life arenas, utilizing the power of initiatory processes that have birthed us and spiritual licenses we have been granted.

We delight in welcoming you to the worlds we ourselves have been invited into and remain committed to learning about and celebrating.


Southern Conjure & Hoodoo Rootdoctoring

Aunt Caroline Dye was a two-headed rootdoctor from Newport, Arkansas at the turn of the 20th Century.

Aunt Caroline Dye was a two-headed rootdoctor from Newport, Arkansas at the turn of the 20th Century.

A hoodoo candle spell for Uncrossing, or spiritual cleansing, of a family, featuring a cross-shaped figural candle in the center.

A hoodoo candle spell for Uncrossing, or spiritual cleansing, of a family, featuring a cross-shaped figural candle in the center.

Few other magico-religious traditions retain the emphasis on folk doctoring - that is, the diagnosing of a client's condition (current life experience) through divinatory means and the effective remedial response that - in the way that hoodoo has.

Hoodoo – also known as “rootwork” and “conjure” – is a tradition of practical magic grounded in the African-American experience of the Southern USA and magical techniques of the Congo.

With a comprehensive materia magica and syncretic practices borrowed from American Indian herbal medicine, Jewish mysticism, Pennsylvania Dutch pow-wow, and East Asian lore, Hoodoo is the only magical tradition unique to the USA.

Hoodoo isn’t a religion. It’s magic. Workin’ roots. Clean and simple.

Practical magic (rather than spiritual devotion, relationship with a particular pantheon, or general spiritual enlightenment) is sorely needed in a world that is, well, practical. People need money, love, luck, success, and want to make their desires manifest. They also need concrete techniques for unraveling nasty curses, increasing their own psychic and intuitive skills, and working with the dead.

Congolese (indigenous African) traditions form the basis of Hoodoo and the form of Protestant Christianity practiced by Blacks in the Southern United States have guided both its survival and evolution over the past 400 years on Western soil. During this time, American Indian, Dutch-Germanic, Jewish Kabbalistic, and East Asian technologies have entered Hoodoo as diverse populations interacted throughout the nation, but its primary practitioners – who may call it “rootwork,” “workin’ roots,” “conjure,” “work,” “that stuff,” or even “goodness” – have always been Black American Protestant Christians.

Greenwood Conjure is called such as our ethos and many of our remedies are grounded in the accessible, practical folk magic technologies of Southern rootwork including the use of herbal baths, oils, tinctures, candle magic, powders, and talismans.


Haitian Vodou

Erzulie Freda, represented by the image of Mater Dolorosa, is one of the most well-known lwa in Haitian Vodou.

Erzulie Freda, represented by the image of Mater Dolorosa, is one of the most well-known lwa in Haitian Vodou.

The wanga (magic) of Haiti is a synthesis of West African practices and those indigenous to the original peoples of the island of Ayiti. Powered by lwa (spirits) from Africa, the Caribbean, and the nations of those that have intermingled with Haitians throughout the island's history, the tradition is known for its robust use of Catholic imagery and ritual displays of dense opulence 

Popular forms of wanga include lamps set with particular lwa, pakets crafted to address certain life arenas, baths performed to remove bad luck and attract favorable opportunities, and a host of other spiritual technologies within this tradition renowned for its heat as much as for its beauty.

Chiron Armand (Houngan Twòp Pou Tè) has been an initiated asogwe priest since early 2016 and is a member of Sosyete La Fraîcheur Belle Fleur Guinea of Mambo Marie Carmel Charles based in New Orleans, LA and Port-au-Prince, Haiti and Sosyete Fòs Fè Yo Wè of Mambo Chita Tann based in Portland, OR.


Contemporary Shamanism

Sound vehicles such as drums and rattles are used for navigating the spiritworld to investigate the root causes of dis-ease.

Sound vehicles such as drums and rattles are used for navigating the spiritworld to investigate the root causes of dis-ease.

Contemporary Shamanism is unique to the industrialized Western world. It draws on the commonalities found in wisdom traditions across the globe to address the unique challenges of those born into cultures that have forgotten, misplaced, or been distanced from ancient practices for living sustainably within an interconnected world.

Common practices are geared toward helping to ensure wholeness and alignment through intimate work with Spirit-given helping spirits (including Animal and Plant Helping Spirits), the elements (Air, Fire, Water, and Earth), deep engagement with the Earth itself and local spirits of the land, and practices such as soul part retrieval / integration, energy body cultivation, and ancestor reverence.

Popularized in the West by the Foundation for Shamanic Studies (founded by Michael Harner) a host of contemporary shamanic traditions exist today with some rooted more than others in existing indigenous worldviews.

Our shamanic healing practices are grounded in intimacy with our own helping spirits and the Cycle Teachings cosmology of the Last Mask Community founded by Christina Pratt of the Last Mask Center for Shamanic Healing based in Portland, OR.